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Corporate Overview

The Standard

Analyzing Cyanotoxins in Surface Water and Drinking Water

Cyanotoxins are toxic bioactive compounds that are released from planktonic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) under certain conditions.1This can result in harmful algal blooms (HABs) that contaminate water systems and pose risks to public health, aquatic life, and the environment. While there are several classes of cyanotoxins with varying degrees of physicochemical properties and toxicity, microcystins are perhaps the most commonly studied class and are known nephrotoxins.

Despite the risks, there are few regulations in existence for maintaining water quality and limiting exposure risks to cyanotoxins. In an effort to promote regular testing in water samples, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has established a number of analytical methods to include the monitoring of 10 cyanotoxins under the Fourth Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR 4). These US EPA methods are written and separated for different cyanotoxin classes, and until recently a cross-class screening method was not available. Brooks et. al. have developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for screening microcystins, nodularin, anatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, and saxitoxin in environmental water and fish tissue samples. 2

CIL offers a collection of highly characterized cyanotoxin standards for research testing purposes.

Featured Products

Catalog No. Description Concentration Amount
DLM-10260-0.025MG Microcystin-LR, ethylated (D5, 98%) Neat 25 µg
NLM-10295-1.2 Microcystin-LR (15N10, 98%) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
ULM-10342-1.2 Microcystin-LR (unlabeled) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
NLM-10340-1.2 Microcystin-RR (15N13, 98%) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
ULM-10341-1.2 Microcystin-RR (unlabeled) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
NLM-10343-1.2 Microcystin-YR (15N10, 98%) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
ULM-10344-1.2 Microcystin-YR (unlabeled) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
NLM-10345-1.2 Microcystin-LA (15N7, 98%) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
ULM-10346-1.2 Microcystin-LA (unlabeled) 10 µg/mL in methanol:water (1:1) 1.2 mL
CNLM-10424-1.2* β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) (13C3, 99%; 15N2, 98%) 100 µg/mL in 0.1 M HCl 1.2 mL
ULM-10493-1.2 β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) (unlabeled) 100 µg/mL in 0.1 M HCl 1.2 mL
 *US Patent Pending 62/368,562
 
1Dittmann, E.; Fewer, D.P.; Neilan, B.A. 2013. Cyanobacterial toxins: biosynthetic  routes and evolutionary roots. FEMS Microbiol Rev, 37(1), 23-43.
2Haddad, S.P.; Bobbitt, J.M.; Taylor, R.B.; Lovin, L.M.; Conkle, J.L.; Chambliss, C.K.; Brooks, B.W. 2019. Determination of microcystins, nodularin, anatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, and saxitoxin in water and fish tissue using isotope dilution liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Journal of Chromatography A.
 





Stable Isotope Newsletters | Cambridge Isotope Laboratories
stable isotope, stable isotope labeled compounds, environmental contaminant standards
CIL has been ready to help with the analytical standards critical to the task of defining and resolving any major environmental contamination problems.